It’s a fact that Macs have gained a lot of traction in SMBs and enterprises over the past few years. You cannot deny it: Employees love their Macs. Why? Macs are especially good at certain tasks like design, creative services, and production. They are easy to use and reliable with more and more employees that use Apple devices in their personal lives asking to use them at work. And of course, they are cool.

 

As the survey below shows, employee preference is the top reason why companies support Macs. While employee satisfaction is no doubt a key driver, there are many other factors that need to be taken into account by IT to support the “Mac invasion” as some people refer to it.

 

 

Imagine you are an IT administrator at a small company of 30 people or so. You juggle hardware, software, the network – and even phone systems and the occasional electrical failure or power outage on any given day. So, when your CEO calls you and says, “I cannot open my sales forecast file,” you rush into action. You check your CEO’s PC and find that the file is somehow corrupted. Then you notice a small red icon at the bottom corner of the desktop with a prompt reading: “Your files have been encrypted. Pay $500 for a decryption key within 10 days or your data will be deleted — click here for payment instructions.”

 

If your company has a mixed environment of Windows and Macs and you've recently tried to upgrade to the latest version of Mac OS X, you have no doubt encountered frustrating incompatibility issues. Why is that? Well, perhaps Apple forgot to tell you something!

Mac OS X has always supported two network protocols: AFP (Apple Filing Protocol), which is Apple’s native file sharing protocol for Macs, and SMB (Server Messaging Block), which is the native file sharing protocol for Windows and is typically used for NAS storage.

With each OS X update, Apple has tried to improve Mac SMB compatibility. But, even with the latest SMB3 support in OS X 10.10 Yosemite, Mac users continue to report frustrating problems, especially with key applications such as Microsoft Office and Adobe Creative Suite.

Many of you may know that a couple of weeks ago Gartner published its first-ever magic quadrant report on Disaster Recovery as a Service (DRaaS). In case you missed it, Acronis is challenging the leaders in this space, and Gartner ranked us highest among the Challengers on our Ability to Execute.

But what does it really mean to you as a customer or future customer of Acronis?

All 14 players included in the Gartner Magic Quadrant are qualified vendors that have no doubt earned their placement in the report. With that said, each vendor offering differs in the way it approaches disaster recovery, the features it delivers, and the resources it allocates to the solution – all of which ultimately impact the actual solution delivered to customers.

So, the question is: How does Acronis differentiate, and where does Acronis fit in this landscape of disaster recovery solutions in the cloud?

In today’s blog, I’d like to step away from the technical aspects of disaster recovery and focus on the human impact. With that in mind, I’d like to introduce you to one of my favorite books on the subject of predictability and inevitability: The Black Swan by Nassim Nicholas Taleb.

 

The book describes Black Swan events as unexpected and unpredictable. However, a person or organization can plan for negative events, and by doing so strengthen their ability to respond, as well as exploit positive events. Taleb contends in his book that people in general — and specifically within companies and enterprises — are very vulnerable to hazardous Black Swan events and can be exposed to high losses if unprepared.

 

Not if, but when!

 

In today’s business world, we need to justify every dollar that we spend, lowering costs, and delivering a return on investment on everything we do. Nowhere is this more true than in IT, where Big Data, Mobility and BYOD are changing the way we work across the globe, requiring companies to an IT depratments to invest and change to remain competitive.

Consider the following facts:

  1. More data is being generated, copied, moved, stored and kept for longer periods of time than ever before
     
  2. Demands for storage keep growing dramatically, but in general, budgets don’t follow the same curve, and don’t increase in the same proportion to keep up

Research shows that even during the recession of 2008-2009, businesses experienced an approximately 40-percent annual increase in storage demand. Now, as the economy is back on track, that growth rate is closer to 60%.

Hi, I am Mark Jameson, the General Manager of Disaster Recovery Business at Acronis.  I am a business person, not a marketing person.  So why have I decided to write a blog? Well, today I felt compelled to share my thoughts with you because something important has happened.

Since its launch on May 28, 2003, Windows Server 2003 has become the backbone of many data center operations. More than twenty million servers worldwide still use Windows Server 2003. According to W3Techs, 25 percent of the Windows-based web servers still run IIS 6.0, running on Windows Server 2003. Now after 12 years, Microsoft has said it will discontinue Windows Server 2003 support on July 14, 2015.

In 2014 alone, Microsoft released 67 security bulletins for Windows Server 2003, deeming 27 of them ‘critical’. As with Windows XP, governments and large corporations can pay Microsoft millions of dollars for out-of-band support. If your organization cannot afford the high cost of extended support, it is time to move away from Windows Server 2003. There are six reasons why you should migrate from Windows Server 2003:

The Enterprise Mobility Management Market will grow from $3,169.0 Million in 2014 to $15,224.1 Million by 2019 according to a new market research report, "Enterprise Mobility Management Market by Solution (Mobile Device Management, Mobile Content Management, Mobile Application Management), by Services (Maintenance & Support, Professional Services) - Global Forecast to 2019", published by MarketsandMarkets,.

With that in mind, I’d like to focus on one of our key Mobile Device Management (MDM) partners, MobileIron, and how Acronis Access Advanced, as a leading Mobile Content Management (MCM), brings true business value to the MobileIron AppConnect platform when they work together.

So what’s MDM without MCM?

Acronis has just released a new backup service - Acronis Backup Service.

It solves business data protection challenges with a complete and easy-to-manage service that backs up any data from any source and recovers to any destination or system.

This unique new offering introduces a revolutionary approach to the backup and data protection tasks. It helps organizations: